How much can I sue an establishment for reporting a false $2,500 collection debt to my credit?

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How much can I sue an establishment for reporting a false $2,500 collection debt to my credit?

A fitness center is reporting a breach of contract to my credit and I have never stepped foot in this fitness center. I don’t know if this is a case of fraud or just someone who has my same name.

Asked on August 22, 2011 Utah

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If your credit report shows a negative mark to your credit for something you know nothing about or ever had any contact or contract for, you need to immediately contact the fitness center who made the report concerning you to ascertain what is its basis for any claimed debt against you, whether or not the claimed debt pertains to you or some other person, and follow up with a written letter confirming the conversation keeping a copy of the letter for future reference.

Potentially what you uncovered could be a case of identity theft or even mistaken identity. At this point I do not see a basis for a lawsuit against the fitness center until all facts are uncovered.

There are companies whose business is cleaning up one's negative credit ratings. You might consider calling such a company to assist you later on over this apparent mistake as to you and your credit rating.

Good luck.


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