How can a sick, now unemployed, interested party to his mother’s will get help to contest his sister’s POA and now the misapprpriation of assets?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How can a sick, now unemployed, interested party to his mother’s will get help to contest his sister’s POA and now the misapprpriation of assets?

Mother died with Alzheimers. DX’d BEFORE 2001. He has will written in ’77. Sister got POA and got will in ’97. She has sold ALL real property, T bonds, insurance policies,stocks, etc.etc, and jewelry. They DO NOT appear on the 1st or 2nd inventory. No money is being held in accounts from these sales. Her life and her chldrens’ have improved dramatically for a non-working mother with a “fix-it, handy-man” husband. New SUVs, pool, large home addtions. Mom kept in an adult daycare for mentally retarded young and old adults. Sis said, “I saved the estate money.” WHAT money?? HELP! He has nothing!!

Asked on May 25, 2009 under Estate Planning, Maryland

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

If you are the interested son, you need to get in touch with an attorney as soon as possible, because time to contest what your sister has done -- and, if it is indeed as you say, she has completely violated the law and your rights -- is probably growing very short, if it isn't already too late.  One place to find a qualified lawyer is our website, http://attorneypages.com

It sounds like there is a very large amount of money involved, and what seems like some fairly gross and obvious wrongdoing.  You should be able to find a lawyer who will take this case on a contingent fee, a "piece of the action," who won't ask you to pay him or her up front.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption