How do child care costs get factored into child support?

The costs of child care, such as day care or baby sitters, is factored into the equation when a court is calculating how much child support one parent needs to pay to the other. How exactly this calculation is made varies by state. In the majority of cases, however, the cost of child care is split 50/50 under the law.

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What about allocation of standard of living?

In a divorce and custody case where child support is being calculated, standard of living will factor into the calculation. Standard of living refers to the type of lifestyle that the child will live, based on income and money available. The general legal understanding is that the child is legally entitled to live at the same standard of living as the parents.

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What counts as income in a child support calculation?

The calculation of child support payments differs widely by state, but in general, it’s based on the broad definition of your total income after taxes and after deductions are taken out’ in other words, your net income. However, while the vast majority of states use your net income as the basis for the support calculation, there are a few that calculate based on gross income. Regardless of whether net or gross income is used, this number is then put through another series of deductions and calculations, depending on laws in your area, to determine how much you must pay.

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Paternity Actions

A paternity or parentage action refers to a legal proceeding in which a parental relationship between a father and minor child is formally established. The action may be commenced by an alleged father seeking custody or visitation, a mother seeking child support, a child seeking to establish a parental relationship or the state seeking reimbursement for public assistance.

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What about paying for private school expenses?

Depending on the particular circumstances of the situation, it’s possible that a judge will order a parent paying child support to cover the cost of a private school for the child. There is not one set rule of thumb about this, simply because it varies according to a number of factors and because the laws in each state may be different.

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Washington Wage Garnishment: Washington Child Support Garnishment

After custody proceedings have ended, Washington wage garnishment law dictates that the court or a state agency issue the noncustodial parent an order for child support collection. This support order is usually served on the noncustodial parent’s employer, and its enforcement is binding on both the parent and the employer to garnish the wages. Child support collection does not terminate for the noncustodial parent when they move out of the state that issued the order. All states follow the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act, which mandates that support orders be followed regardless of the state that issued them.

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Michigan Child Support Garnishment Limits, Exemptions and Protections

Even though a parent may owe child support, not all of his or her earnings are subject to wage garnishment, and certain limits will apply under Michigan garnishment law. Michigan laws allow for the support of children while maintaining the core means by which the supporting parent is able to support him or herself as well. There are two major ways in which limits are set on child support collections: by setting limits on the percentage taken from a parent’s earnings and by setting limits on how’earnings’ are defined. If a parent is subject to multiple garnishment orders, further limits are set by allocating which order is satisfied first and giving certain types of orders priority over others.

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