Did I get wrongfully terminated or am I a victim of identity theft?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Did I get wrongfully terminated or am I a victim of identity theft?

My boss gave me a company credit card with my name on it, like it was mine. And then turned around and fired me for

Asked on June 1, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You are wrong: whether or not you wanted a company credit card, when given it, you chose to use it--you could have left it in your wallet. More, you evidently chose to use it for non-work expenses; however, a company credit card may ONLY be used for work-related expenses--anything else is essentially stealing: taking company money for your own benefit. Just as you can't submit a reimbursment request for non-work expenses, you can't use a company credit card for non-work charges. If you used a company credit card for anything not work-related, you may be terminated "for cause" (for a wrongful act; no unemployment benefits) for doing so; may be sued to recover the money you spent on non-work charges; and could, in particularly egregious cases, face criminal charges.
Also bear in mind that all employment is employment at will unless you have a written employment contract to the contrary. An employee at will (anyone without a contract) may be terminated at any time, for any reason, including that the employer doesn't like his/her use of a credit card.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption