How can an Ohio marijuana lawyer help me?

An experienced Ohio criminal attorney can help you defend against a charge of marijuana possession or distribution. Although having an attorney is not required when facing a misdemeanor marijuana charge, a local attorney will be familiar with state and local laws, as well as with the local court system and judges.

→ Read More

Ohio Marijuana Laws: Is Marijuana Legal in Ohio?

Possession of marijuana is illegal in Ohio. Currently, there is a bill working its way through Ohio’s legislative process that, if passed, would legalize medical marijuana. However, despite polls showing that Ohio residents are strongly in favor of legalizing medicinal marijuana, the bill is not expected to be approved by the legislature.

→ Read More

How would a conviction for Ohio marijuana possession affect my auto insurance?

Outside of a conviction for driving under the influence of marijuana in Ohio, a marijuana conviction is unlike to affect your car insurance rates or coverage. Car insurance companies usually only raise your rates or drop your coverage for convictions relating to traffic offenses. So, if you are convicted of a marijuana DUI in Ohio, you may find your rates raised or coverage cancelled, depending on the policies of your insurance carrier.

→ Read More

Ohio Medical Marijuana Laws

As it is in most states, medical marijuana is illegal in Ohio. In April of 2010, Ohio General Assembly Representative Kenny Yuko proposed H.B. 1393, which would legalize medical marijuana. A previous medicinal marijuana legalization bill, proposed by Ohio state senator Tom Roberts in 2008, failed to gain traction. Despite general approval by Ohioans, the new bill is not expected to be passed into law.

→ Read More

Is K2 illegal in Ohio?

The substance popularly known as K2 (JWH-018), in addition to other cannabinoids, is legal in Ohio. K2, also known as genie, spice, zohai, fake weed, or synthetic pot, is typically sold as incense. Although sometimes referred to as “synthetic marijuana,” the term confuses K2 with tetrahydrocannabinols, which are illegal under state law.

→ Read More