How can a Georgia marijuana lawyer help me?

An experienced Georgia criminal attorney can help you defend against a Georgia marijuana charge. An attorney can help you get the charges against you dismissed, reduced, or obtain a lesser penalty than you might otherwise have received. Although you do not have to have an attorney to fight a misdemeanor marijuana charge, an experienced marijuana attorney will be well-versed in Georgia law and the local court system where you must appear.

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Can I be charged with possession of marijuana if I’m a passenger in someone’s car and marijuana is found? What does’possession’ mean under Georgia marijuana laws?

You can be charged with possession of marijuana in Georgia if it is found in a car in which you are a passenger. However, if the marijuana was not found on your person and did not belong to you, you have a good chance of avoiding a conviction. Similarly, as the driver of a car when marijuana is found inside, you can be charged with possession even if the marijuana did not belong to you. As in many states, Georgia legally defines’possession’ as either physical or constructive.

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Marijuana and Georgia Drug Courts

Georgia drug courts are a subsection of Georgia’s Accountability Courts. Like all Accountability Courts, drug courts refer perpetrators to treatment programs rather than prison. Jurisdictions that have drug courts receive direction and assistance from the Judicial Council Standing Committee on Drug Courts.

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Georgia Medical Marijuana Laws

Georgia does not allow medical marijuana, despite the efforts of some medical marijuana advocates. Unlike other populous states, Georgia has not even had a medicinal marijuana bill introduced in the legislature in recent years.

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Is K2 illegal in Georgia?

In May 2010, Georgia passed a law making illegal the substance popularly known as K2 (JWH-018), as well as other cannabinoids. K2, whose other popular names include genie, spice, zohai, fake weed, or synthetic pot, is typically sold as incense or potpourri. Although sometimes referred to as “synthetic marijuana,” the term confuses K2 with tetrahydrocannabinols, which have been illegal under Georgia law for some time.

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