How can theclerk of the courthave me pay more then what is on the order that the judge issued?

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How can theclerk of the courthave me pay more then what is on the order that the judge issued?

“The Court will allow Defendant to either pay the $741 in full or complete 74 hours of community service at a non-profit organization by 11-29-10. One or the other must be done – no mixture”. So I paid the $741 but now the clerks are saying that I need to pay an extra $741. Will the paperwork that shows all I need to do is only pay $741 hold up in that same court house? I’m on a limited income and it was difficult to come up with the initial payment.

Asked on November 19, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, California

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Why would the clerks be asking for an additional payment of the exact same amount of money?  It sounds as if your payment was not recorded somehow.  How did you pay it?  By cash or by check?  Did you get a receipt?  Did you pay it to the clerk of the court directly?  There is no reason that you should have to pay an additional amount if that is what the order actually says. I would go down to the Courthouse with your receipt and double check on the matter.  If the clerk is still telling you that you have to pay I would seek help from a higher up.  Just keep asking for a supervisor.  I would also contact the prosecutor's office on the matter to see if they ave any information.  Good luck. 


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