Can my parents cause problems for me ifI move out once I’m 18?

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Can my parents cause problems for me ifI move out once I’m 18?

I am a 17 year old student. I will be 18 next month. I want to move out of my house and go live at a friends once I turn 18. I have a place to stay. The family has a home here in town and are good people. My mom and I got into an argument about how she doesn’t give me a right to leave now, but once I’m 18 I’m more than welcome to go. She suggested I had no place to stay but I told her a friends parents said I can live with them. She had then said to me “We’ll see how well that works out because you don’t know what I have up my sleeve.” If I inform my mom when I am leaving so I am not considered to have “disappeared” can she do anything to cause a problem for me? Or is she just using that line to scare me into staying?

Asked on January 4, 2012 under Family Law, New Jersey

Answers:

Stephanie Squires / SquiresLegal Services

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Once you turn 18 you are considered a legal adult.  You then have all of the rights and responsibilities of an adult.  You do not have to tell your parents where you are going or what you are doing, legally speaking.  Legally, you do not have to tell your mom when you are leaving.  Your question of "can she do anything to cause a problem for me" has two answers - 1.  Anyone can do things to cause problems, but if you are asking 2. Can she legally prevent you from moving out - the answer is no. 


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