Can I still bring a case against a school after 2 yearsfor racial discrimination in hiring?

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Can I still bring a case against a school after 2 yearsfor racial discrimination in hiring?

I was passed over for a high school math teaching position by a person that was not qualified for the job. I have over 12 years teaching experience. I am an African American female and the school is all white and the teacher hired is a white female. I only recently found out the circumstance that surrounded the hiring of the other teacher. I was told by a board member that the principle only sent them the one applicant as the only qualified person who applied for the job. He had no idea that I had applied for the position. Under the circumstances can I now pursue a case against the school? What is the time limit? My family and I had just moved into the area and my kids now attend the private high school. The teacher that was hired was allowed to attend the university during the mornings in order to get her qualifications for the job.

Asked on December 31, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Washington

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you believe that you were discriminated in the work place due to your ethinicity and you have a prima facie case for discrimination and resulting damages, you might have a legal basis for bring a lawsuit against the school district that you work for.

In order to ascertain the basis for a discrimination action against the school district and the chances of success, you should consult with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and get a right to sue letter.

You should also consult with a labor attorney. Generally the time limit to bring a lawsuit is 180 days from the wrongful act for discrimination not based upon age.


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