Can I file any type a civil suit against noisy and disruptive neighbors when my apartment complex will not intervene?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I file any type a civil suit against noisy and disruptive neighbors when my apartment complex will not intervene?

I have complained about my upstairs neighbors and their noise since their first week moving in. My apartment community will not deal with it and the on-site Security Officer has spoken with them on numerous occasions. There has to be something that I can do on my own.

Asked on September 21, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Tennessee

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You may be able to do one or both of the following, but since neither is necessarily easy or straightforward, you should speak with an attorney before doing anything:

1) You may be able to file a nuisance complaint against the tenant directly, and possibly against the landlord for the fact that he is allowing his tenant to create a nuisance.

2) It may be possible to bring an action against the landlord for allowing violations of your right to quiet enjoyment, and therefore seek either monetary compensation or a court order forcing him to take action.

In addition, contact city hall: there should be noise ordinances on the books. Find out the allowed decibel levels for different  times of day and night. Rent or buy a decible meter and test; if it looks too high, you can contact the police or other authorities.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption