Can I claim unclaimed money from an insurance company that lists my deceased father as the owner?

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Can I claim unclaimed money from an insurance company that lists my deceased father as the owner?

When checking on an unclaimed money site I found my deceased father’s name with an undisclosed amount from an insurance company. My father died in 1986 leaving no will and everything went to his then wife (my stepmother) who died in 1987 My sister and I were listed as beneficiaries on his work life insurance and did receive those monies. My sister and I are his only living relatives.

Asked on January 3, 2011 under Estate Planning, Kentucky

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You can receive the unclaimed property.  The state where your father resided would have an unclaimed property department, an office as part of the state government.  You would need to contact that unclaimed property department to obtain the appropriate forms to submit your claim.  The forms might be available on the website for the state's unclaimed property department.  Information requested on the forms may include proof of heirship, a copy of your father's death certificate, etc.  The requested information on the forms is to establish your right to inherit those funds.

If you receive any letters from so-called companies offering to file the requested information for you in exchange for a percentage of the funds, don't get involved with those companies because the forms are very easy to complete and there is no need to have those companies receive any of your funds for submitting the paperwork.  If you have any questions about completing the forms, you can contact the state's unclaimed property department and they will provide information to help you complete the forms.  There are also instructions that come with the forms.


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