Can a business partner remove another business partner without their permission?

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Can a business partner remove another business partner without their permission?

My father opened a business with my cousin’s husband. My father payed for everything with his credit cards to get the business going. Once the business started growing my cousin and her husband told my father that his name had been removed from the company and he was no longer a partner. My dad never received anything from that company. They just took him off and it was like he was never a partner. They said all this was done by an accountant they have. What can we do to fix this?

Asked on July 22, 2011 New York

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Hire an attorney as soon as you can.  May I ask: did they have a written partnership agreement?  I some how fear that they do not.  They then have a verbal agreement.   What confusesme here is when you say that his name has been "taken off" the partnership by the accountant.  Taken off of what?  The bank accounts?  If he was listed some where this is a good thing as it is some sort of proof of his claim.  The credit card statements as well.  He needs to get this done as soon as possible and possibly hit the business with an injunction to halt operations until it is ironed out, although that may do more harm than good to the business.  The attorney will tell you your options.  Good luck.


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