How do I obtain a death certificate for a family member lost in an aviation accident?

Obtaining a death certificate for a loved one killed in an aviation accident can be a very difficult process. Legally, the death certificate cannot be issued until the body is identified, and this is not possible in all cases and can take a significant amount of time. The amount of time this might take can vary greatly depending on the nature of the airplance crash, the number of victims, and the size and efficiency of the medical examiner’s office.

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Who is legally liable for damages in a general aviation accident?

When an aviation accident takes place, and accident or injury results from it, there may be questions regarding who is considered legally liable to compensate the victims. The answer is that legal liability in such a situation will vary’ sometimes greatly’ depending on the specific details of how the accident occurred, and an aviation accident attorney should always be consulted. In some cases, it can also depend on where the aviation accident took place.

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What should I do if I am injured in an airplane or aviation accident?

If you have been injured in an aviation accident, whether you were a passenger on an aircraft at the time of the accident or you were injured after the aircraft made it to the ground, the first thing you should do is to get adequate medical attention. After receiving medical attention, the next key step is consult a reputable aviation accident attorney.

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Who do I call to get information immediately following an aviation accident?

Waiting for information after an aviation accident can be extremely stressful, especially if you are concerned about family members you believe may have been aboard the plane or planes involved. If awaiting updates on an aviation accident, there are a number of different resources available to you that may be able to help you to get information quickly

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What role does the FBI play in the investigation of an aviation accident?

Under federal law, most “major” airplane crashes (approximately 2,000 annually) are under the jurisdiction of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). The NTSB has the power to designate other agencies as “parties” to the investigation: once a crime is suspected, the FBI will be designated as the lead party by the NTSB. The FBI’s initial role is to investigate the possibility of sabotage or some other criminal act that may have contributed to the accident. Though the FBI is frequently consulted in many aviation crashes, they take over jurisdiction only in cases where criminal acts apparently form the reason or motive for the accident, or where some specific federal law requires FBI involvement.

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What is the cause of most general aviation accidents?

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) – the lead federal agency in investigating aviation accidents – reports “pilot error” as the cause of the vast majority of general aviation incidents. However, ‘pilot error’ is a more complicated concept than it may seem at first:

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