Will I have a record for accidentally knocking on someone’s door when I was drunk and an attempted burglary report was filed?

I got drunk and accidentally knocked and tried to enter the wrong house which was close to my friend’s house where I was staying. I realized it was not the correct house and left without entering. While leaving I dropped my phone on the lawn. The residents of the house filed a report for “attempted burglary” as they were unsure what was going on. They gave my phone to the police. I tracked the phone online and went the next day to the police. I explained and they believed me. it was an honest mistake. I was not arrested or charged with a crime. They took my info. Will this be on my record?

Asked on July 2, 2012 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

Cameron Norris, Esq. / Law Office of Gary W. Norris

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You have no "record" until charges are filed by the D.A.'s office. 

The police report itself will always exist, but I wouldn't worry about it.

This is nothing you have to disclose with employers, schools, etc. 

Two expert legal suggestions: (1) prepaid phone without personal information, and (2) drinking wingman.

Best of luck.


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