Should I get a lawyer if I was rear-ended and started treatmentwith a chiroopractor?

I told the chiropractor that I was feeling better at that time, which has been about 4 weeks now. I called the chiropractor back and told them I was having pain again and the lady said I would have to pay out of my pocket for treatment because my case was closed. Does the insurance company still have to pay for my treatment or should I get a lawyer? I signed a paper at the chiropractor saying I was OK at that moment.

Asked on October 8, 2011 under Personal Injury, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You should visit with a personal injury attorney about your case.  Before you set up an appointment, gather as many of your records and notes as possible so that the attorney can give you a better assessment of your situation. The statute of limitations for a personal injury lawsuit has not run...but a great deal of what future remedies you have will depend on what you have already signed or agreed to and the nature of your injuries.  It’s hard to tell based on your question what exactly you signed, but this could potentially be a deal breaker for some future remedies—depending on what you signed or agreed to.  If you have already reached a settlement of some sort, a personal injury attorney may not be able to offer much more help.  However, if the document that you signed was just some type of assessment form between you and your doctor, you may still have some viable options depending on the extent of your injuries.   Soft tissue injuries tend to be a bit more subjective than more concrete injuries (say a broken arm).  A personal injury attorney will need to see the extent of your injuries to see if there are other options for getting the insurance company to pay.  Many personal injury attorneys will give you a basis consultation free of charge or for a nominal fee.  If you are still in pain, it’s worth the time to see what exact options are still available to you. 


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