My boss says I quit because I told her I was looking for another job I told I did not quit I do not want to quit she refuses to listen

I work for a hair salon. Last week she took away our
productivity, which can be up to several hundred dollars
monthly in additional income. I informed her that I would be
looking for another job and at that when I found another
job, I would then put in my two weeks notice. She told my
manager that I had quit, I informed both my manager and my
boss that I did not quit that I had no intentions of
quitting until had another position somewhere else. she
refuses to listen to either me or my manager. she told my
manager to not put me on the schedule because I quit. I did
not quit and she knows this.

Asked on October 3, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Once you made it known to your employer that your intention was to quit your job (even if not immediately), that was tantamount to your having given notice. This is the result of informing your employer that you were looking for another job. Accordingly, unless you have a union agreement or employment contract to the contrary, your not being put on the schedule is legal.

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Once you made it known to your employer that your intention was to quit your job (even if not immediately), that was tantamount to your having given notice. This is the result of informing your employer that you were looking for another job. Accordingly, unless you have a union agreement or employment contract to the contrary, your not being put on the schedule is legal.


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