How much notice to move must a tenat be given and does a landlord have rights to their belongings?

I stayed with my cousin for a month and a half and norent was charged. However, while I lived there I fed and watched her 4 kids, washed clothes, cleaned their hair etc. About 2 weeks ago on a Saturday night, she wrote me on Facebook telling me that she wanted me to leave and take my stuff by the following Tuesday. I explained to her I could not do that by Tuesday. Ever since then I’ve been trying to get my stuff from her but she won’t let me. Now she is talking about selling and giving my stuff away. Is that legal?

Asked on September 12, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Nevada

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

No, it is not legal.  You seem more like an employee than a tenant here but either way you term yourself, if you left your belongings at her home and entrusted her with them then the law would call that a "bailment."  If she did anything to harm your belongings or sell them that would be called "conversion" under the law and she would be liable for their value.  Explain this to her calmly.  Tell her that you wish to come and get your things on X day at X time and come.  Maybe even with the police if they will come but definitely with a witness that is a neutral party.  Maybe another family member can talk to her about it all before it gets to this point?  Good luck. 


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