Harassment in work place

I’m not really looking to take legal action unless it’s 100% necessary. More then likely I’ll just find another job. Anyway, I’ve been at an auto shop for a little over 2 weeks. The owner of the shop has been grabbing me by the arm and neck to move me places and talk to me. He’s one of those extreme micro managing type of employers. I have 10 years experience in this field and definitely don’t need a this job if this is what I have to deal with everyday. Anyway, it’s definitely a sign of aggression that I don’t like. I thought he was just a touchy talk with his hands kind of guy until today. I just put a car up on a rack ,and not even 10 seconds into talking with a co-worker about what else needs taken care of, he saw me there talking to my co-worker. He decided to come up and micro manage as usual but before I could tell him what was going on, he had me by the arm talking with me unable to get a word in. Then he grabbed me by the back of the neck; it was very disrespectful and unprofessional. Anyway, tomorrow I was going pull him aside and tell him not to touch me and if it continued I would like to file a report with HR, as well as look for other employment. Just in case he does it to someone else.

Asked on April 18, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Nevada

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

If he does an act that constitutes assault (e.g. hits you), you could press charges (and, if injured, sue him, but not the business unless he is a sole proprietor, for your medical costs, injuries, etc.). However, short of that, there is nothing you can legally do: the law does not require managers to be respectful (including respecting personal space), manage well, treat employees with courtesy, etc.--basically, bad, harassing, and micro management is legal.


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