Florida: does my employer have the right to demand I take on responsibilities that are not in my job description that interfere with the actual job?

I am a Registered Nurse in Quality Control, they have made me do 90% of another office mates job because she can’t keep up plus I’m expected to do some of my bosses job, my own job, and yet help another coworker. Now they tell me I have to go work in the emergency room as a bedside nurse during work hours as well. I get paid a salary, exempt from overtime, extra pay perks, and don’t get paid for certifications because I am classified as a non clinical staff member. This work in the er will make me stay late for no more pay and will make it impossible to do my real job. What rights do I have?

Asked on July 2, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

If you're a non-clinical staff member, I'd draw the line at the emergency room work, at the very least.  Your employer can ask you to do it, you can say no.  They can fire you, but I sort of suspect that there's still enough of a shortage of registered nurses that they won't do that so quickly.  They're trying to pile all of this on you to avoid hiring more staff.

Neither choice is a great one.  You can also go along with this for now -- but start getting your resume out and following the job postings.  "At will" means they can do this to you -- and it also means you can drop them the day you find something better.

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

If you're a non-clinical staff member, I'd draw the line at the emergency room work, at the very least.  Your employer can ask you to do it, you can say no.  They can fire you, but I sort of suspect that there's still enough of a shortage of registered nurses that they won't do that so quickly.  They're trying to pile all of this on you to avoid hiring more staff.

Neither choice is a great one.  You can also go along with this for now -- but start getting your resume out and following the job postings.  "At will" means they can do this to you -- and it also means you can drop them the day you find something better.


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