Did my job do me wrong if I was suspended without notice?

I have been a night auditor for 9 months. I’ve been doing the same thing every night no problems; I have never been in trouble. I even came in early on my days off. I’m getting paid $9.50, I work midnight to 8:00 am. I have 20 years of customer service and 8 years of management. About 2 weeks ago, I talked to my boss about getting a raise. She that she needs to get a review together’ it will be about a week or so. And yesterday I went into work for my 4:00 to 12:00 shift that and the owners son told me that was I suspended until next week. At first he wouldn’t tell me why but then I pressed. He said for discrepancies in my audit. However, I was not given notice, a paper, nothing.

Asked on January 18, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Nevada

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, unless you had a written employment contract for a defined or set period of time (such as a one-year contract) which was still in effect (unexpired) and which by its plain terms prevented this or guaranteed you employment (i.e. not being suspended or terminated), this was legal. Without a written employment contract, you are an employee at will: an employee at will may be suspended (or terminated, demoted, pay or hours cut, etc.) at any time, for any reason, without any prior or written notice and without any proof or evidence of wrong doing. An employee at will has no protection for his or her job.


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