Car Accident – State Trooper found me at fault and wont change police report?

About 6 months ago, I was in a car accident
where the officer deemed me at fault Ill
describe the story here.

Two are two vehicles, car a and car bmyself.
Both vehicles were traveling on a two lane road
where car A was in front of B, and then the
road widens to accommodate multiple vehicles
beside each other. Also it becomes a multi-lane
road even though the road markings were at
first easily seen but then fade away quite a
bit. Car A moves to the right while Car B moves
to the left, and car A then collides with B
because they were wanting to make a left turn.
Police was called and car B was faulted because
he couldnt see the markings and said it was a
single lane so car B shouldve never been
beside car A. Car B didnt have an insurance
hit since it was a government vehicle, and also
assumed it wouldnt show on their license due
to this. Eventually it did.

I had pictures of the road markings taken the
day after the incident and showed them to the
officer, however after a long time since the
report was created. He denied my evidence and
stated even if the lines are there, if they are
not clearly seen, its still my fault even
though I obeyed them. What can I do now?

Asked on December 4, 2018 under Accident Law, South Carolina

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

You can't make him change his report: it represents his opinion of fault in the accident and he is entitled to his opinion and cannot be compelled to alter it. It is also not an official adjudication or determination; if you are sued over this, the police officer's report and opinion is evidence, nothing more, and does not guaranty that the court will find you at fault. You can, in an adjuducation or legal proceeding, present your own evidence and testimony to the contrary and attempt to convince the court, etc. that you were not at fault.


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