Can someone not give you copy of contract

Hi I’m a professional boxer, I signed a
contract over a year and half ago with
a promoter. My contract should state
how many fights I’m suppose to have per
year and also what intinary the
promoter suppose to pay for. I been
asking for a copy of my contract and
haven’t got one yet. I haven’t fought
as many times as I’m suppose to and
really want to get out of contract and
believe it’s voided, I believe that is
why I can get a copy.

Asked on April 11, 2017 under Business Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

The law does not generally require the other party to give you a copy of your contract; it's something you should have made sure you received at the time you signed. The only way to get a copy now, if the other side does not want to provide one, is in a lawsuit: in a legal action, there are legal mechanisms (called "discovery"; e.g. written questions or interrogatories, document production requests, etc.) by which you could get a copy, but those mechanisms are only available in litigation. So if you believe that the promoter has violated the contract and therefore terminated it (since if one party violates or breaches a contract in a "material," or important way, the other side can treat the contract as ended or terminated by that breach) and so you stop performing under it (e.g sign up with another promoter), then if the promoter were to try to sue you to enforce the contract, in that lawsuit, you could get a copy of the contract. Or alternately, if you were to sue the promoter for monetary compensation for his breach--for not providing you enough fights; in this example, you'd sue for the money you should have made on the extra fights--you  could again, in the lawsuit, use discovery to get the contract. But there has to be a lawsuit, by him against you or by you against him, to legally compel him to give you the contract.


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