Can my ex-employer be held accountable for missing and late payments?

I live in one state and pay child support to another. My former boss garnished my checks for child support. Over the course of 8 years he has made late payments and missed others. When I contacted my caseworker she told me to contact the local child support office, IRS, and Department of Labor, however no one will take action against him. What can I do? Can anything still be done? I filed a complaint with the ombudsman and am still waiting for a response.

Asked on July 22, 2012 under Family Law, Arizona

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If your wages were garnished under some court order and your former employer failed to make payments to the sheriff's office as required by the garnishment order and made them late, then you should consult with an attorney that practices in the area of consumer law to assist you in the matter that you are writing about.

If you cannot afford an attorney, I suggest that you go to your local "legal aid" office for assistance. There is a possibility that after the passage of eight (8) years, any claim that you may have against your former employer for improprieties as to the wage garnishment could very well be barred by the statute of limitations in the state where your former employer resides.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.