Can my employer question me about my daughter’s doctor note even though I’ve only called out twice in the year I’ve been there?

I’ve been at my current job for a year and I’ve only called out twice. The other day my daughter got sick and I took her to the E.R. I was scheduled to work that day so I made sure I called my manager to tell her I wasn’t coming in for that reason. She said to bring in paperwork on my next shift. I just want to know if she can ask for that. My daughter isn’t the employee, I am so why do I need to bring in paperwork for her. It’s not in the handbook sayiing that I have to do so. So I really want to know can she do that and it’s not policy?

Asked on July 11, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, North Carolina

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of all states in this country, one's employer can legally ask for medical back up such as a doctor's note verifying why the employee was unable to make it to work on a particular day.

You write that your daughter was ill and you took her to the emergency room resulting in a call to your manager at work stating that you would miss work that day due to illness in the family. Your daughter's physician's note stating that your child was ill on this particular day would verify your excuse for not attending work on the day in question.


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