Can my employer force me to receive a Hep C test?

And try to view the results? My boss suspected I may have contracted hep c from an ex girlfriend and feels me being around has endangered my coworkers. Can he legally fire me for refusing his demands? I’ve been an excellent worker for him for over 5 years now

Asked on August 8, 2015 under Employment Labor Law, Tennessee

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Yes, your employer may make it a requirement or condition that someone who may have had exposure to a potentially communicable disease provide some proof or documentation that he is disease free. And if you do not have a written employment contract, you are an "employee at will" which means, among other things, that you may be fired at any time, for any reason, regardless of your past work history or the quality of your work. So it does appear that your employer can force you to do this...the simple (and sad) fact is that employees at will have very few rights at work.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Yes, your employer may make it a requirement or condition that someone who may have had exposure to a potentially communicable disease provide some proof or documentation that he is disease free. And if you do not have a written employment contract, you are an "employee at will" which means, among other things, that you may be fired at any time, for any reason, regardless of your past work history or the quality of your work. So it does appear that your employer can force you to do this...the simple (and sad) fact is that employees at will have very few rights at work.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.