Can I as a mother give up my rights?

I have a 16 year old who lives with her father after I divorce. I haven’t seen her since 2015. She recently reached out to tell me she does not wants nothing to do with me. With that could i give up my rights. In the best interest for her.

Asked on December 11, 2017 under Family Law, Texas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Terminating parental rights is not something that the courts take lightly and it isn't necesarily done in your situation.  And honestly, if you ever want a relationship with your daughter, if you tried to terminate it would be the nail in the coffin for that to happen.  Teenagers are a strange lot and girls and their moms can be the worst scenario. They come around eventually - really.  Showing her that you love her unconditionally by dropping a note and remembering special occasions and holidays may not seem like it matters now, but later in life it can make the world of difference.  Do not sit back and let her dictate the relationship.  YOU decide if you wan to be a part of HER life and do so in a gentle and supportinve way by still giving her space. Tell her that you respect her decision but that you will always love her and be there for her and that regardless if she wants to particiapte in your life together, you will be participating in the limited capacity you can.  You will never get back the ability to see your daughter graduate from school or other life evnts.  Do not let her take that from you.  Good luck.


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