If a child has been told by the custodial parent that she cannot see the other parent and if she asks, she loses all her priveledges, can anything be done?

Can you get free help if you seriously cannot afford an attorney even if you have a good job?

Asked on September 5, 2012 under Family Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

This is a difficult situation because it requires putting the child on the spot with the court, judge, everyone... including her custodial parent.  You can file a motion with the court to restrict the other parent from making these types of comments.  A better plan of action is to file for custody on the basis that this is an emotionally abusive situation to put the child in... essentially arguing that you should have custody while ex- goes through some serious counseling. 

As far as legal help... several attorneys through this site and elsewhere will often allow clients to use payment plans.  This is a change from the days when attorneys demanded payment in full, up-front.  You can also call around to different legal services groups... you may qualify for free help after they consider your child support obligation and other bills.  A final option, it to contact the district clerk in your county (or a nearby county) and see if the local bar association hosts pro bono clinics.  This is where local lawyers show up to offer free or reduced fee services to people that need help with legal issues.


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