Will the courts allow me to move for a new job, if I have sole legal and physical custody of our children?

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Will the courts allow me to move for a new job, if I have sole legal and physical custody of our children?

My ex has supervised custody because of drug transactions with the kids present, plus verbal abuse and threats. I was awarded sole custody with supervised visitation that he rarely shows up for even if it is only 2x a month for an hour. I have 3 kids whom I was a stay at home mother to before my ex cheated and soon after quit his job. He made $125,000 a year but stayed at home for a year so when the child support was determined he wouldn’t have his past earnings factor in. I get $125 a week for the kids. I work 3 jobs now and still we struggle but I was offered a great job out of state.

Asked on April 27, 2012 under Family Law, Connecticut

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you were offered a great job out of state where you have sole legal and physical custody of the children from your marriage I suggest that you consult with a family law attorney as to whther you need to advise the court of your intent to move out of state and get court approval to move the children out of the court's jurisdiction.

Some courts have reference regarding moving of the children (minors) within the order needing court approval. I suggest that the court order concerning child custody and visitation be carefully reviewed by you and a family law attorney.

I suggest that you file a petition with the court seeking permission to move out of state with your children for a better life and to get a court order approving such. Once done, you will be in good shape with the court system if approved.


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