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will information

do beneficiaries addresses go in a will or just the town they live in?

Asked on March 25, 2009 under Estate Planning, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

In most states the standard practice is to name the beneficiaries and contingent beneficiaries (as well as the executor, the guardians, and alternates) and their relationship to the person (my daughter Mary Smith, my son Bill Jones, my Nephew Mike Roberts, my sister Sara Jones, my friend Charles Green, etc.) without any city or street address, except where necessary to distinguish amongst two or more people with the same name (as if you had two nephews named Mike Roberts -- it can happen).

Rather than put in the addresses, a note to the intended executor -- that is kept with the Will -- listing the full contact information (name, street address, city, phone, email address) of each person named in the Will is a better idea; contact information changes. so why risk making an error in the Will itself?

One of the most important aspects in any do it yourself will is having it properly executed and witnessed according to the laws of your state. The laws vary widely, in terms of the number of witnesses needed, whether they have to see you sign or just be told, whether they all have to be in the same room at the same time, etc.

Also, a state-appropriate affidavit from each witness is often a good idea as without one there can be extra delays in getting the Will admitted to probate when the time comes.


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