WillI go to jail for breaking my bond if the condition was not to see someone and they showed up at my house?

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WillI go to jail for breaking my bond if the condition was not to see someone and they showed up at my house?

My ex found me several days after we got got of jail for theft. I got out because I said I would testify against him; I have no priors and he has a list of felonies. He beat me and threatened to kill me or send me back to jail if I told anyone. I managed to escape and he was arrested. I was able to get a restraining order so we have court and now he trying to say I broke my bond.

Asked on May 9, 2011 under Criminal Law, North Carolina

Answers:

M.S., Member, Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In light of the facts that you provided, it does not sound like a judge would violate you for violating your conditions of release.  Unless there is something to suggest that you contacted him, or allowed him to come see you, then typically defendants are not violated for these types of unintentional acts.  Given the fact that he was arrested for the incident, it seems likely that your side of the story will prevail.  Nevertheless, due to the fact that your liberty is at stake, I highly recommend consulting with an experienced criminal defense attorney prior to your next court appearance in order to ensure that there are no surprises and that you do not find yourself locked up on a high bond with no representation.


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