Will becoming an escort hurt and/or ruin my chances of getting into law school or hired by a firm?

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Will becoming an escort hurt and/or ruin my chances of getting into law school or hired by a firm?

I am a Canadian undergraduate with a significant amount of debt and hopes to enter law school within the next 2 years. The only forseeable way for me to alleviate my debt and make anywhere near enough money to pay my way through law school is to take an opportunity presented to me to become an escort. This is a legal business and I would be registered as an employee there.

Asked on April 12, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

While it does not have to hurt your chance of law school or of being hired--there is no law preventing you from going to law school or working as an attorney if you were or are an escort--it is very likely it would hurt your chances. Schools, for example, have discretion on whom to admit, so long as they don't discriminate on certain protected bases, such as sex/gender or racial discrimination. Similarly, employers have considerable discretion on whom to hire, again so long as they don't discriminate on protected bases. No law protects you on the bases of your other or prior employment, however--a school may refuse to admit you, or a law firm (or other employer) to hire you, if it believes that your other or prior job either could hurt them, because it is a job that is commonly held in low esteem and which evokes strong negative feelings, or because they believe (whether rightfully or wrongfully) that it shows some character or moral flaw in you. Given common beliefs and attitudes about escorts, it is easy to imagine a law school denying entrance to you on that basis--and impossible to see a law firm, which will not do anything which could damage its ability to attract and retain clients, hiring an escort to work in the firm.


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