Why was I denied purchase of a firearm in 2008 because of a misdemeanor reckless endangerment charge?

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Why was I denied purchase of a firearm in 2008 because of a misdemeanor reckless endangerment charge?

I pled guilty to reckless endangerment in 2004. I purchased a pistol in 2006 from a gun store that ran a background check and I bought it with no problem. In 2008, I decided I wanted a different gun, so I went to the same gun store to trade my gun in on another one. When the did this background check, they denied me. I was shocked. I appealed it and was still denied. I was arrested because I basically threw a temper tantrum and punched some holes in the wall and my wife called the law on me. Their was no assault or weapons involved. Is their anything I can do to clear this up?

Asked on December 7, 2010 under Criminal Law, Tennessee

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Gun laws have gotten stricter over the years and it may be that the requirements for purchase changed.  Many states have added misdemeanors that deal with domestic violence to their list of offenses that may not be expunged or sealed and they may have also added the misdemeanors to the list for the permit rights as well.  It is best that you seek help from an attorney in your area on the matter.  Have him or her run a background check on you and see what come sup. Then discuss if your charge is eligible for expungement and how it relates now to gun permit laws.  You can understand that there is a greater good here as to protection of those in volatile domestic relationships.  There is a public policy argument.  Sometimes you get caught in the mix.  Good luck.


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