Why did I get a letter in the mail saying I have failed to adequately respond to Complaint Ticket in CT when I didnt get the speeding ticket?

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Why did I get a letter in the mail saying I have failed to adequately respond to Complaint Ticket in CT when I didnt get the speeding ticket?

I let my friend borrow my car in CT and apparently he got a speeding ticket without notifying me. And a month later I receive a letter in the mail saying I have failed to adequately respond to complaint ticket, I lost touch with the kid and I live in MA what do I do. Shouldn’t the letter have been sent to the person I let borrow my car not me since I wasn’t driving the car?

Asked on May 16, 2009 under Insurance Law, Connecticut

Answers:

J.M.A., Member in Good Standing of the Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I am a lawyer in CT that deals with this type of law ona regular basis.  The letter should have gone to the kid that borrowed the car as it was his license that the officer should be penalizing, NOT yours.  I presume you have a new court date to show up; correct?  Depending on how fact the kid was going will depend on how big the fine is.  Plus, if you plead to the ticket and send in the money, your insurance is bound to go up anywhere from $500-1500 next year.  What court are you in?  If you want help with this where you most likely wont have to go to court let me know as this sounds really unfortunate.  It may cost you $750 or so (estimate), but if the ticket is thrown out, you will have saved a lot more than that in insurance premiums over the next few years and the ticket wont be on your record continuing to affect your insurance rates.  let me know -  Jared @ 860-214-1137. 


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