Who do I contact for an address change regarding a theft charge against me?

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Who do I contact for an address change regarding a theft charge against me?

I was involved in my first theft of an item worth $50. The department store wrote the wrong down the wrong address. I have the case number and do not know who to contact of the change. I spoke to a detective and he took my information down which he said he will call back to confirm the change, which he never did. I tried to call but am not able to get a hold of him. Who do I contact regarding a report number address change before it’s too late? Also, what will be my penalty if I end up going to court? I am an adult.

Asked on May 31, 2011 under Criminal Law, Rhode Island

Answers:

M.S., Member, Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You have asked a few questions, so I will take them one at a time.  I suggest you contact the clerk's office for the court in the jurisdiction where the crime took place.  The "case number" that you have might be the police report number, not the court case number, which are different.  The clerk's office will be able to tell you your court date, which you must appear for.    You should also ask the clerk how to go about reporting the address mistake.  Chances are, they will advise you to tell the judge on your court date, who will then order the clerk to note the correct address in the file.  Second, with respect to the penalty, there are usually diversionary programs available to first time offenders for these types of crimes.  In any event, I suggest that you consult with a local criminal defense attorney in the interest of obtaining the best possible resolution of this matter.  Good luck.


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