When someone is receiving rehabilitative alimony can they still reside with their parents and family members or will they have to seek out different residence?

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When someone is receiving rehabilitative alimony can they still reside with their parents and family members or will they have to seek out different residence?

The ex-wife is receiving $500 a month alimony for the next 3 years. During the court proceedings her main reasoning for the alimony was so that she and her daughter could have their own place. She is currently living with her parents and siblings. Will she have to move out into a place of her own to still receive the $500 alimony, or will they overlook that fact because she is living with family members and not someone of the opposite sex?

Asked on December 20, 2011 under Family Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If your former wife is receiving a set amount of rehabilitative alimony so that she and her daughter could reside in their own place but are now staying with her parents and family members, you need to carefully read the court's order for this type of alimony of $500.00 per month to see if it is conditioned upon her having her own separate place where she paid rent or not.

Meaning, is this alimony allowed for her payment of rent or not? If she is living with parents and family members and actually paying rent of $500.00 per month or more to these people, then it seems that your former wife should continue receiving the $500.00 monthly amount from you. If she is not paying any rent, then it seems that the purpose of the alimony is not being met and you should consider a petition to end the payment to be filed with the court.


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