What should I do if I got assaulted at work and the boss did not kick the culprits out or call the cops?

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What should I do if I got assaulted at work and the boss did not kick the culprits out or call the cops?

I work at a Vietnamese restaurant/bar; I get paid under the table and I am underage. I got assaulted 2 days ago by a drunk a customer and her friend. I got 2 scratches on my face, my head, neck, and my shoulders hurt. The boss did not kick them out or call the cops on them. Security also did not call the cops. I came in the next day to look at the surveillance footage and the boss’s husband did not show me the whole thing. He only showed me where I got hit but just the last 10 minutes of the footage. When I told them I wanted to call cops, they said let it go, you will mess up our business.

Asked on February 5, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

Archibald J Thomas / Law Offices of Archibald J. Thomas, III, P.A. - Employee Rights Lawyers

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

File a notice of injury and workers compensation claim. The law prohibits an employer from terminating an employee because of the filing of a workers compensation claim.  After that you can call the police and take any other action you deem appropriate.

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Contact the police anyway and explain what occurred. Before you go, take pictures you can immediately show the police and indicate to the police you saw the footage. Explain what occurred and see if anything can be done. You can also talk to your parents about hiring an attorney to sue the business but keep in mind, if you are being paid under the table, a) you will no longer have a job with that company and b) if anything is reported to the IRS, you and the company may be audited.


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