What should I do? I’m on probation and someone is trying to blackmail my wife….

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What should I do? I’m on probation and someone is trying to blackmail my wife….

Someone is trying to blackmail my wife into her giving him nude photos of herself to him or he is going to make up some story to try and get me in trouble with the law. I’ve done nothing wrong I don’t know this guy he is a previous ex of my wife from years ago and has not stopped bothering her since. Now he found out I’m on probation and is threatening to talk to the FBI and make something up to where I get arrested and sent away. I’ve done nothing wrong I’m almost done with my probation and I don’t know if I should call the cops and report these emails or wait to see what happens I live in NY

Asked on June 28, 2009 under Criminal Law, New York

Answers:

M.S., Member, Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Although I do not practice law in the State of New York, I can appreciate that this is a very delicate and stressful situation.  You should remember that blackmail/extortion is a crime -- therefore, this individual's actions most likely have exposed him to criminal liability.  Moreover, based upon the facts that you have provided, if he has, in fact, made these threats via email, there may be documented proof that he has committed these crimes, which can be traced back to him.  I suggest that your wife collect all of the evidence of the blackmail/extortion and then you and her consult with and/or retain a criminal defense attorney in the interest of both protecting your rights while at the same time presenting the proof of this extortion to the appropriate law enforcement authorities.


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