What should I do about an unknown debt that is supposedly in collections?

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What should I do about an unknown debt that is supposedly in collections?

I have had a debt collector contact me demanding money, and will not give me any information regarding the collection besides the fact of how much they want me to pay. He claims I have gotten e-mails which I haven’t, and I know for sure that I haven’t received a billing statement. He demands that I pay this loan amount in full by writing a letter via FAX giving them permission to debt my account With all of my account information, and when I refuse He threatens that I could be arrested, and go to jail for fraud. What should I do or say I am going to attempt to contact him again?

Asked on September 2, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Alabama

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Under federal law as well as under the laws of most states there is legislation against unfair debt collection practices. If the debt collector will not provide you with any concrete information such as his/her name, mailing address, telephine number, name of business he/she is working for as well as send you a demand letter on the collection company's letterhead, and the basis for the debt (creditor, amount and creditor's address/telephone number) it seems that you have been approached by a person who is trying to defraud you.

Do not give this person any personal information. No social security number, no driver's license number, no date of birth, no bank account information.

You need to contact law enforcement immediately about this and/or your county's district attorney's white collar crime unit. Advise law enforcement about the threats and give law enforcement as much information that you presently have.

 


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