What options do I have to collect unpaid wages after performing work for a company?

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What options do I have to collect unpaid wages after performing work for a company?

About a month and a half ago I did work for a guy who owns a landscaping company. I did 22 hours of work and still have not seen a penny. He did not have me fill out an application(I believe this is to make it near impossible to bring charges against him) however, I do have a witness. I have been emailing him and at first He responded. Now I can’t even get anything from him.I would also like to know if I can charge interest and if so, how much? I want to squeeze everything I can from this guy. I don’t understand how he can get away with this.

Asked on June 11, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Ohio

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You can sue for the money owed you. When you work for someone pursuant to an agreement, even if only an oral one, that he or she must pay you for the work done, that agreement is enforceable and you have to be paid. You could sue in small claims court, acting as your attorney; you would need to prove by a "preponderance of the evidence," or that it is "more likely than not" that you did the work and the amount you should have been paid.

You may not recover interest, however, unless there was an agreement between the two of you specifically providing for interest in the event of late- or nonpayment.


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