Ifour landlord is the one who wants us to move, can she ask usto put in writing that we are the ones who want to leave?

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Ifour landlord is the one who wants us to move, can she ask usto put in writing that we are the ones who want to leave?

My boyfriend’s ex is a stalker and has caused domestic disturbances at our rental. Due to the violence and property damage this third party has imposed, our apartment manager has asked us to move before our lease is up. But she wants us to do it voluntarily and give her a 60 day notice (the day she wants us out is sooner than 60 days). I don’t feel comfortable putting this in writing. I feel like we will be setting ourselves up for all kinds of fees from the apartments for breaking our lease when the managegr is the one who asked us to leave. We have open cases with the police and are pressing charges for the domestic altercation and property damage.

Asked on August 16, 2011 Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If the landlord's apartment manager wishes you to end your lease early and to give her a 60 day notice to vacate, write her a confirming letter first about her desires, the reasons for her request, and the fact that by terminating your lease early at her request, you will not be responsible for any fees for ending this lease early. In the letter, ask her to send a confirming letter in response. Keep a copy of your letter for future reference.

Assuming you receive a confirming letter from the apartment manager as to your intent, write a 60 day notice confirming the apartment manager's letter to you stating the date of your final day in the rented unit and give it to the manager. Keep a copy for future reference.

The above suggestion should solve your concerns.

Good luck.


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