what kind of trouble could i be in for writing checks on my now deceased father’s closed account

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

what kind of trouble could i be in for writing checks on my now deceased father’s closed account

I wrote several checks on my now deceased father’s closed account for food for me and my son and his family. I couldn’t let my two grandkids go hungry and I am way below poverty level. A investigator has called me about two of the checks that I wrote at the same store. Also a sheriffs deputy came to my brothers house looking for me and showed him a copy of the two checks and he also told him that I had been arrested a few days earlier in a nearby town for the same thing. I know I shouldn’t have done it but I didn’t know what else to do. I’ve been in jail and I don’t want to go back or even worse it get turned into a felony and go to prison. Please help me in figuring out what to do. I don’t have good enough credit to get a loan to pick up and pay for all the checks. I told the man at the store where I wrote the two that the police know about that I would pick them up but I don’t have the money and I don’t know anyone that I could borrow it from

Asked on July 1, 2019 under Criminal Law, Mississippi

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

You have committed one or more of the following offense: theft, from your father's estate, if the checks were honored, because you are not entitled to the money in his account until and unless the estate is properly processed and the money distributed to you; or if the checks were not honored, you stole from whomever cashed your checks or sold you things which you paid for by the checks, and you also committed the crime of passing bad checks. You therefore have potentially committed felonies. You really need a lawyer to help you if at all possible: try contacting Legal Aid or if the won't hep you, contact local law schools, to see if they have an programs where students (under supervision) provide legal help to those who can't afford lawyers, or contact your city and state bar associations and see if they can refer you to an attorney who will help you "pro bono" or for free.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption