What is the purpose of pre-trial release for first time offenders?

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What is the purpose of pre-trial release for first time offenders?

I was realeased on pre-trial release, I have no prior history and I’m obeying the rules of the law since being home. In NY.

Asked on November 3, 2010 under Criminal Law, New York

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

From the time that an offender is arrested and charged with a crime, an assessment begins to determine what level of incarceration and services are required. Such assessment and supervision serves to protect public safety, match offenders with appropriate services, and save jail beds for more serious criminal offenders.  The primary purposes of pretrial programs are to assist the courts with release decisions and to supervise defendants who are awaiting trial within the community to ensure appearance at court and protect public safety.  Pretrial assessment provides accurate information so that the court can best determine the best outcome for both the offender and the public. An individual’s overall status including the current charge, social and criminal history and Failure-To-Appear record is evaluated by the Assessment Unit who prepares a comprehensive report for the judge regarding each individual’s eligibility for Graduated Restriction Release Program Options ("GRRPO"). GRRPO are designed to serve the non-violent defendant charged with minor crimes, include Pre-Trial Electronic Home Confinement, Enhanced Pretrial Services Supervised Release, Enhanced Diversion Programs, a Day Report/Day Treatment Center, Urinalysis Testing and a Limited Custody Facility. Judges may use any or a combination of all restrictions.


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