What is the process for bringing a child to US born in another country?

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What is the process for bringing a child to US born in another country?

I am a US citizen born in US but residing in Pakistan. I along with my parents migrated to Pakistan when I was just 3 months old. Since then I never came to US. Now I am 24 years old and married. I recently had a daughter in Pakistan and I want to bring her to the US. Which Visa should I apply for her from Pakistan. What is the process? Some people tell me that I have to apply for her green card and start the process by filing form I 130 because I never fulfilled the US citizen residency requirement of living here for atleast 5 years.

Asked on April 24, 2012 under Immigration Law, Maryland

Answers:

Osas Iyamu-Attorney at Law / Law Offices of Osas Iyamu, LLC-Immigration Law Office

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

 

If you did not pass U.S citizenship to your child at birth,then you are required to file the required Immigration application necessary for her to obtain lawful Permanent resident status in the U.S.


Since you have been out of the U.S since when you were three months old,you will not be able to satisfy the legal requirement for passing on U.S citizenship to your child.

The process starts with the filing of Form  I-130 Alien relative Petition.

I hope the above helps

Harun Kazmi / Kazmi and Sakata Attorneys at Law

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

That is correct. Since you have not resided in the US, you must file for her I-130. You can file for your wife at the same time. It will take about 9 to 12 months for them to enter with Immigrant Visas. They will also need financial sponsors who live in the US.


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