What is the next step for a victim of a violent crime after restitution?

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What is the next step for a victim of a violent crime after restitution?

I was awarded $65,000 in restitution by the county court for suffering a double fractured jaw and to broken molars by someone my landlord had help him try and physically remove me from my rental home without following through the legal eviction process. My landlord brought the guy to my place of residence and helped him break into my dwelling and punch me in the face. The guy is now sitting behind bars and is ordered to pay me restitution which I am doubtful I will ever see. My concern is my landlord has so far walked away a free man as I struggle to heal and piece my life back together.

Asked on June 30, 2015 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You write that the landlord hired your attacker and/or brought him to your rental home, and evidentally was physically with the attacker when you were hurt, to conduct an illegal lock out; on that basis, your landlord may very well be liable for assault, or for aiding and abetting (as an accomplice to) an assault; possibly for burglary (for illegally entering your home for an illegal purpose); and maybe for an illegal lockout (many states provde compensation for illegal lockouts, to help make sure landlords only try to lock out through the courts). There are multiple grounds on which your landlord may be liable, and you may be able to recover medical costs, some amount of pain and suffering, lost wages (if any), and 1 or months of rent (for the illegal lock-out). Given how severe your injuries were, and therefore how much money may potentially be at stake, you should consult with a personal injury attorney about suing your landord (many such lawyers provide a free initial consultation, by the way; you can confirm this before making the appointment). You landlord seems to have been, based on what you write, legally in the wrong; there is no reason not to look into holding him accountable. Good luck.


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