What is the likelihood that I will receive a pretrial diversion for a paraphernalia with intent to use charge?

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What is the likelihood that I will receive a pretrial diversion for a paraphernalia with intent to use charge?

I am an 18 year old college student attending a university and I have straight A’s. It is paramount that I do not receive a conviction so I may keep my federal financial aid for the next school year and continue excelling in my education. This is the only way that I may keep my aid. How do my chances stand for receiving a pretrial diversion?

Asked on March 23, 2012 under Criminal Law, Idaho

Answers:

Kevin Bessant / Law Office of Kevin Bessant & Associates

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Pre-Trial Diversion Programs are generally offered to first time offenders of relatively low level misdemeanor offenses, and non-violent low level felonies. The benefits of the program is that upon a successful completion, the criminal charges are either dismissed or not prosecuted (nolle pros). The problem is that pre-trial diversion programs are court specific and offense specific, so it is difficult to determine if drug paraphernalia is one of those offenses that qualify for pretrial diversion in your area. Consult a local criminal defense attorney in your area to see if your situation qualifies, and if not, what other legal remedies are available to prevent you from having a criminal record in this case.


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