What is the laws on multiple wage garnishments

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What is the laws on multiple wage garnishments

Last week my check was more then this
week and I had the same hours and same
pay but more was taken out.

Asked on April 25, 2018 under Bankruptcy Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Wage garnishment can be very complex, since it varies by why you are being garnished--e.g. were you sued and lost? is it for taxes? for student loans? for child support? Different limits apply to each, so a mix of different types of garnishments can make calculating the maximum garnished difficult. To therefore vastly oversimplify, for most kinds of garnishments (e.g. for being sued and losing for any of a number of reasons), up to a total of 25% of your "disposable" earnings may be garnished. ("Disposal" income is your wages/salary after taking out tax withholding or any other deductions required by law.) That could be 25% for one garnishment, two of 12.5% each, a 10%, a 10%,  and a 5%, etc. But some garnishments have higher limits, like child support (up to 50%--or sometimes more--of your wages!). If they had been previously miscalculating one of your garnishments, they can then increase it in the future once they catch the mistake, up to the maximum allowable for the types of garnishments you have; while they can't exceed the appropriate maximum (so if child support is one of the garnishments, you could easily have garnishments equaling or exceeding 50%), they can, with the appropriate court order, take out up to the maximum, even if previously, they had been taking out less.


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