What is the landlord’s responsibility when dealing with a mouseinfestation?

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What is the landlord’s responsibility when dealing with a mouseinfestation?

I found 2 live mice in my apartment. I spoke with management who said that there was nothing they would do other than put down glue traps. I would have to dispose of them. I am going crazy. It’s mental anguish. I’m scared to walk around in, cook in, or go to the bathroom in my home now. My apartment is littered with glue traps. I live in a building with 1 other apartment. The leasing office is below us. The leasing office staff confirmed they have caught 3 mice. What is their responsibility, when does it become an infestation, at what point is it a health hazard?

Asked on May 10, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Michigan

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

It is now an infestation if the downstairs office has found three mice. Mice are pests and spread disease. In addition to hygiene issues, this is a habitability issue and you cannot be required to live in the premises with this going on. You can inform them in writing of their options, which include them sending pest control to remove and prevent, or you paying someone to do the same and you taking the cost out of your rent and/or them paying for you to relocate while this is handled. Immediately call your consumer protection agency in your state that handles landlord tenant matters like the Attorney General or the Housing and Urban Development Agency. Call the health department and see if they are the agency to help you or if it is building and safety or another agency.


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