What is the best course of action to collect on2 outstanding invoices for consulting and design work on a private residence remodel?

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What is the best course of action to collect on2 outstanding invoices for consulting and design work on a private residence remodel?

I had been hired as a consultant/designer to on a private residence. Within the last few weeks of completion, owners actually chose to move in. My client became lax in paying the sub-contractors in a timely manner and they were not going to continue until the balances were made current. I followed up with the client, in writing, attempting to resolve a number of issues that were delaying completion of the project. He refused to respond. Now he is refusing to pay over a cabinet issue that he signed off on.

Asked on September 13, 2011 under Business Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Your course of action is to sue: the client or customer must pay you for all work which you (or which your subcontracttors performed), if it was the work requested and done to acceptable standards (and sign off would be powerful evidence of that). You may also sue for any additional costs or losses you have incurred  as a result of the client's wrongful refusal to pay, such as if you have had to borrow money to meet expenses and therefore have incurred interest or loan application fee charges. That's the good news--you have legal recourse, and can sue. The "bad" news is that if you want to get paid, you'll have to sue--there is no one who will take care of this matter or see to your payment for you. Good luck.


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