What is the average % a husband is liable for alimony when a couple separates?

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What is the average % a husband is liable for alimony when a couple separates?

I have been married for 5 years and am in the process of separation. My spouse has never worked during our time together. I currently earn approximately $6,000/month gross but bring home only $2,900 after taxes and all. What will I be liable for percentage wise for alimony?

Asked on July 17, 2012 under Family Law, New York

Answers:

Anthony Van Johnson / VANJOHNSON LAW FIRM, L.L.C.

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You indicated that you have been married for 5 years, are about to separate from your spouse (who was not employed during the marriage), and currently earn $6,000 per month.  You inquired about what percentage your spouse would be entitled to in the form of alimony.  Under Georgia law, there is no percentage to which a spouse is entitled to for alimony.  The court will look at the facts of each case and make an independant ruling based on the facts.  In one case I was involved in, the judge refused to award any alimony to the unemployed spouse who was capable of working with  no health issues that would prevent her from working.  You did not mention why your spouse has not been employed during the five year marriage, so I have no knowledge as to whether his health is an issue.  Additionally, the judge will look at the length of the marriage, the finaces (assets and expenses) of the parties, expenses associated wiith moving/relocating out of the marital home, as well as, any other pertinent facts.  You should retain the services of an attorney as soon as possible.  The attorney can prepare your case with an eye towards either eliminating or minimizing any alimony obligation in your divorce action.


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