What is generally considered normal wear and tear on 50 year-old windows?

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What is generally considered normal wear and tear on 50 year-old windows?

My landlord discovered a window with a chip/crack about 1 1/2 inches long and a piece about 1/2″ by 1″ out of the corner of another. I never hit these windows or anything. In fact they are so small I never noticed them. She also put the maintenance she did on the unit on my closing inventory checklist. I feel that the spots on the window are possibly from heat stress or rocks from a lawnmower or something like that. Am I still responsible for this?

Asked on August 5, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

There is no hard and fast rule. That said, glass does not generally break unless subject to some force or impact. While it is obviously not certain that it was the responsibility of you, your family, or your invited guests, it is a reasonable supposition that you or an invitee or yours was responsible, especially inasmuch as  the window is in your possession and under your control. Under the circumstances, as long as the amount being charged for repair or replacement is reasonable, it highly unlikely that a court or other legal body, if this somehow came before them, would not allow the landlord to charge you for it. Probably the best thing to do is to just make sure the repair estimates are valid and reasonable, then pay them (or not protest the cost being taken from a security deposit).


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